Language Pride…

I BELIEVE YOU CAN HAVE A PROMINENT NATIONAL LANGUAGE AND STILL EMBRACE AND ENCOURAGE OTHER LANGUAGES. WE ARE A DIVERSE NATION AND WE SHOULD RESPECT OTHER PERSONS AND ENCOURAGE THERE CULTURE, NOT SUPPRESS IT.

LOVE IS A UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE.

If we cannot communicate with words, we should think outside the box instead of getting upset and discouraged by other people’s differences and/or learning curve. I spent 2 months in a country where I could not communicate for a while verbally, but it was a rich and rewarding experience and helped me grow as a person. In my travels no one ever demanded that I speak their language (French or Spanish) but they would encourage me if I did want to learn, and they would also ask me to teach them bits of my language. This was a great way to bond; experiencing one another’s culture intimately, is tremendously unifying, and it was priceless.

Yes it is beneficial and helpful to have a prominent or universal language for communication and commerce, but do we have to have this at the expense of diversity and multi/bilingualism?

I will admit I myself have gotten frustrated with situations that are relative, but I catch myself and remind myself that I am not the center of the universe, other people’s struggles matter too. Obstacles are opportunities to maneuver and overcome, they should not be knocked down and pushed out of the way to save pride. I think maybe people are afraid of loosing some sort of “National” identity, but really diversity is what makes US beautiful and special.

I wish more people would see this and embrace it, instead of acting out of fear, which just causes unnecessary disunity.
But hey, that’s just my opinion. Peace.
~AbbieLu

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3 thoughts on “Language Pride…

  1. I love the way you think! Three years ago, a family of Syrian refugees moved in next door to me. They spoke only about 7 words of English, and I spoke no Arabic. But we learned to communicate with smiles, hugs, hand gestures, and the universal language of compassion, of love. Today they are dear friends. They speak English somewhat better, and I have learned a bit of Arabic, so it is a win-win. We share stories, food, holidays (both Arabic and English) and have a strong bond. How much I would have missed out on if I had shunned them because they did not know the language. Thank you for this post … it is beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

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